• Books
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    Want a superior vocabulary?
    Direct Hits offers selective vocabulary using relevant examples with vivid presentation so students can achieve results on standardized tests and in life. Read more
  • Classes
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    Achieve High SAT and ACT Scores
    Success takes guided practice and concentrated preparation. Our teachers bring years of classroom teaching and tutoring experience to the Direct Hits prep classes. Read more
  • Blog
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    5 Observations on Connecting With Today’s...
    The following observations are about Generation iY (i.e. students born since 1990) that may help you as you attempt to communicate and... Read more

Proven methods to increase SAT, PSAT & ACT test scores

Why Direct Hits?

Classes That Deliver
SAT Vocabulary
Words In Context

Direct Hits Education has a proven system for achieving higher SAT scores. When students begin the Direct Hits program, their scores run the gamut, but by utilizing the knowledge and strategies of our teachers, they consistently make impressive gains on the SAT and ACT. Each year Direct Hits students are admitted to top colleges and universities, often qualifying for lucrative merit scholarships. One group of students was even featured as the “Person of the Week” on ABC Nightly news.

Vocabulary is a key part of the Critical Reading section of the SAT. On a typical SAT, the sentence completions, critical reading passages, and questions contain approximately 150 different vocabulary words. Knowing these words is essential to achieving high Critical Reading scores.

Most students believe that learning new words is a tedious chore that involves memorizing long lists of “big but useless” vocabulary words. Students across the country and around the world are praising Direct Hits for its vivid, relevant examples and extraordinary number of words that appear on the SAT. The words are all gathered from real SATs. SAT test writers draw upon a relatively small pool of words that are used repeatedly on the test. As a result, the Direct Hits vocabulary books consistently produce a large number of “hits.”

A great list of words is important, but it is just the first step. Since many SAT words are difficult, it is essential to illustrate them with vivid, relevant examples. Vividness is closely related to retention. We remember memorable and relevant experiences, forgetting boring experiences more quickly.

Direct Hits’ vocabulary is defined with vivid pop culture and academic examples drawn from movies, television programs, historical events, and books that students are currently studying in school. Students remember a word because they can remember the context. This makes Direct Hits one of the most effective learning tools for SAT preparation.


What our customers are saying

  • I am so happy with the Direct Hits series. These books are easy to read and to understand. Learning the words also builds confidence. I recommend them highly.

    ~ Frances Kweller, Kweller Test Prep

  • I wanted to let you know that our son got into Columbia University (Early Decision)!! Thanks again for all your work with him on the testing!

    ~ Parent, 2014

  • If you master what's in these two books, you're going to raise your SAT scores and potentially put scholarship money in your pocket.

    ~ Paul Hemphill, Planning For College

  • I just wanted to let you know with your help our daughter was admitted to 8 out of 9 schools she applied to! Thanks again for all of your great advice and time.

    ~ Parent, 2014

  • My daughter, a Direct Hits alum, received a $20k scholarship from her college for being a National Merit Finalist.

    ~ Parent, 2013

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I would recommend this book to students needing a little extra vocabulary practice before taking the SAT and to others that have an interest in increasing their command of tough vocabulary.

    ~ Parent (via Librarything.com)